Friday, 10 January 2014

A Great Reading Week


A really great week for reading - that began with us in Perth and me reading Nina Sankovitch's inspiring memoir - and saw us returning to Manchester and a rapturous welcome home from Bernard Socks. I had a mid-week spent devouring Neil Gaiman's 'Ocean at the End of the Lane' and just this tea time I finished a couple of days with Armistead Maupin's 'The Days of Anna Madrigal' - which was just *bliss.*

What have you been reading this week, then?


8 comments:

  1. Hi Paul
    I've just bought the Neil Gaiman book for 99p on Kindle so I'm looking forward to reading it soon.
    I was delighted to read that Armistead Maupin has a new Tales of the city book out .I love them all and now can't wait to get it.
    I've just read The distant hours by Kate Morton.670 pages for book group.The story isn't bad but there was too much description.I kept thinking, just get on with it.
    I've also just read The little old lady who broke all the rules by Catharina Ingelman Sunberg, about some pensioners in a care home in Sweden who take to crime to better their lot.It was a great idea but not as funny as I hoped.
    I'm reading the latest Lesley Cookman at the moment.
    All the best
    Anne Crossland






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    1. I hope you'll enjoy the Gaiman and the Maupin - both are good additions to their respective ouevres! I've never read Morton - should I? I bought the 'Little Old Lady' in the kindle sale, too (a long with a whole lot of others - ouch.) I'm a bit behind with Lesley - and must catch up!

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  2. Whilst the Kate Morton book wasn't bad I wouldn't recommend her, although several amazon reviewers said her 1st two books were much better.I feel there is so much better stuff more to my taste out there to be read.
    I went a bit mad in the kindle sale as well and with such a huge TBR pile it's so deliciously difficult to decide what to read next.

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    1. 'deliciously difficult' is a lovely way to put it. What's really working for me is not deciding what I'm going to read next until the very last moment...

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  3. A friend and colleague brought a couple of boxes of books to work (they were donated by his nephew who was moving to NSW). Before they all disappeared (I was surprised by how many avid readers there were among my colleagues and horrified at the speed at which the books walked out the door before I had a chance to have a really good look through them), I managed to grab a Paul Macguire, a Mark Rowlands, a couple of Jasper Ffordes and Something Borrowed by Paul Magrs.

    I have just finished reading the latter - what an utter delight, I loved it to bits! I came across this website when I googled your name in order to track down other titles in the Brenda and Effie series.

    Of course, while here, I also read Anne Crossland's comments. I was particularly interested in Anne's remarks re The Little Old Lady Who Broke All The Rules - the plot premise sounded so familiar yet I'm sure that I've never read this book. Then the iconic lightbulb flashed metaphorically above my head - there's a similar idea included in one of Janet Evanovich's books. I can't recall which one but I'll track it down if it's of interest. I do remember that it was very funny!

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    1. Thanks, Michelle - that's lovely to hear, about how you discovered Brenda and Effie. They tend to sneak up on people like that.

      And thank you for reminding me - I want to read more of Janet Evanovitch: I've only read one and liked it a lot.

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  4. Thanks Michelle .I would be interested.I have a pile of Janet Evanovich books somewhere waiting to be read, so I may have it already. I remember the joy of finding my first Brenda book.It's the best series ever

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